You Get Sloppy Drunk

thecocktailhunter:

Crystal Malt
Used to make Bushmills 1608 which imparts a sweet, toffee like flavor to the whiskey. We currently sell it at my bar for $29.
“Crystal malts are prepared separately from pale malts. They are high-nitrogen malts that are wetted and roasted in a rotating drum before kilning. They produce strongly sweet toffee-like flavors and are sufficiently converted that they can be steeped without mashing to extract their flavor. Crystal malts are available in a range of colors, with darker-colored crystal malts kilned at higher temperatures producing stronger, more caramel-like overtones. Some of the sugars in crystal malts caramelize during kilning and become unfermentable; hence, addition of crystal malt will increase the final sweetness of a beer. They contain no enzymes. ASBC 50-165/EBC 90-320; the typical British crystal malt used in pale ale and bitter is around ASBC 70-80.”
Source: Wikipedia
Currently Sipping: Fighting Cock Seven Grand Single Barrel

thecocktailhunter:

Crystal Malt

Used to make Bushmills 1608 which imparts a sweet, toffee like flavor to the whiskey. We currently sell it at my bar for $29.

Crystal malts are prepared separately from pale malts. They are high-nitrogen malts that are wetted and roasted in a rotating drum before kilning. They produce strongly sweet toffee-like flavors and are sufficiently converted that they can be steeped without mashing to extract their flavor. Crystal malts are available in a range of colors, with darker-colored crystal malts kilned at higher temperatures producing stronger, more caramel-like overtones. Some of the sugars in crystal malts caramelize during kilning and become unfermentable; hence, addition of crystal malt will increase the final sweetness of a beer. They contain no enzymes. ASBC 50-165/EBC 90-320; the typical British crystal malt used in pale ale and bitter is around ASBC 70-80.”

Source: Wikipedia

Currently Sipping: Fighting Cock Seven Grand Single Barrel

fastcompany:

For the Irish whiskey’s latest effort in its “Since Way Back" campaign, the brand and agency Cornerstone has Aaron Paul telling a tall tale dubbed “Cooking with Meteors” with a few old friends and some animated help. Basically, the actor did such a great job convincing his roommate that a meteor had landed in their backyard that his buddy’s girlfriend actually called in the media. It’s a great gag and not, as the more cynical among us may suspect, one exaggerated for the benefit of the brand. Paul actually told the original story on a Conan appearance last year.

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bobbycaputo:

HEADPHONES MADE FROM WHISKEY BARRELS

You could make anything out of old whiskey barrels and we’d probably want to buy it. A miniature show pony made from Johnnie Walker casks? Give us a bucket full. A better example, these new headphones from Grado. The limited edition cans are handcrafted from recycled white oak that was once use by Bushmills over in Ireland. They come with a vented back design, a custom brown leather headband, and hopefully the sweet smell of oaky booze whenever you put them on.

kajajean:

Jesseeeeeeeeee
this one’s for @uhpeksha ❤️
found on the Bedford L stop
#brooklyn #jessepinkman #breakingbad #nyc #advertisement #whiskey #bushmills

kajajean:

Jesseeeeeeeeee
this one’s for @uhpeksha ❤️
found on the Bedford L stop
#brooklyn #jessepinkman #breakingbad #nyc #advertisement #whiskey #bushmills

itspartyrehab:

Cucumber CoolerIngredients & Measurements:
1.5 oz Gin
4-6 Cucumber Slices
1/4 Lime (Sliced)
4 oz. Tonic Water
6 Mint Leaves
1 tbsp Sugar
Instructions:Add mint, lime, gin, and sugar to shaker and muddle the ingredients. Add cucumber slices to shaker and shake. Pour mixture over glass filled with ice and top with tonic water.

itspartyrehab:

Cucumber Cooler

Ingredients & Measurements:

  • 1.5 oz Gin
  • 4-6 Cucumber Slices
  • 1/4 Lime (Sliced)
  • 4 oz. Tonic Water
  • 6 Mint Leaves
  • 1 tbsp Sugar

Instructions:
Add mint, lime, gin, and sugar to shaker and muddle the ingredients. Add cucumber slices to shaker and shake. Pour mixture over glass filled with ice and top with tonic water.

food52:

Meet the drink that turns the Negroni on its head.
Read more: The Negroni Flip on Food52. 



Serves 1

1 ounce gin
1 ounce Campari
1 ounce Carpano Antica, or whatever sweet vermouth you’ve got
1/4 ounce rich simple syrup (see note)
1 large egg
Orange peel, for garnish

food52:

Meet the drink that turns the Negroni on its head.

Read more: The Negroni Flip on Food52. 

Serves 1 1 ounce gin 1 ounce Campari 1 ounce Carpano Antica, or whatever sweet vermouth you’ve got 1/4 ounce rich simple syrup (see note) 1 large egg Orange peel, for garnish
judena20:

If you know me, you know I’m a Negroni fan.
The first time I ever had a negroni was when I made one for a guest at the bar, who proclaimed that it was “perfect.” From there, I knew I had to try this drink on my own and have since fallen in love.
The origin’s of the cocktails are unknown, however it is widely believed that Count Camillo Negroni invented the drink in Florence, Italy when he wanted to booze up his favorite cocktail, the light and refreshing Americano (Campari, sweet vermouth and club soda) by adding gin in place of the soda. Well done, Count Negroni. I would give you a high-five, for sure, if you were still around.
So what exactly is a Negroni? 
Simple, 3 ingredients—Gin, Campari and Sweet Vermouth—all in equal parts, stirred and strained or over fresh ice. Garnished with an orange twist or slice and finito! This drink is at once savory, crisp and bitter, but with an underlying sweetness to it. In addition, as you slowly sip—yes, this drink is a sipper—the flavors of the cocktail start to open up and become more pronounced, giving the cocktail new life minute after minute. 
After some time, you can start to experiment and create your own variations with spirits like Cynar, Aperol, Punt e Mes and Lillet. In fact, you can even make a white negroni, but we’ll save that for another day.
Bartender tip: You always want to stir cocktails that contain only spirits as you’ll get a clean, vibrant and clear finished product—no bits of ice here!

judena20:

If you know me, you know I’m a Negroni fan.

The first time I ever had a negroni was when I made one for a guest at the bar, who proclaimed that it was “perfect.” From there, I knew I had to try this drink on my own and have since fallen in love.

The origin’s of the cocktails are unknown, however it is widely believed that Count Camillo Negroni invented the drink in Florence, Italy when he wanted to booze up his favorite cocktail, the light and refreshing Americano (Campari, sweet vermouth and club soda) by adding gin in place of the soda. Well done, Count Negroni. I would give you a high-five, for sure, if you were still around.

So what exactly is a Negroni?

Simple, 3 ingredients—Gin, Campari and Sweet Vermouth—all in equal parts, stirred and strained or over fresh ice. Garnished with an orange twist or slice and finito! This drink is at once savory, crisp and bitter, but with an underlying sweetness to it. In addition, as you slowly sip—yes, this drink is a sipper—the flavors of the cocktail start to open up and become more pronounced, giving the cocktail new life minute after minute. 

After some time, you can start to experiment and create your own variations with spirits like Cynar, Aperol, Punt e Mes and Lillet. In fact, you can even make a white negroni, but we’ll save that for another day.

Bartender tip: You always want to stir cocktails that contain only spirits as you’ll get a clean, vibrant and clear finished product—no bits of ice here!